THE PENTICTON SCOTTISH FESTIVAL

Saturday July 6, 2019

King’s Park, 550 Eckhardt Ave in Penticton BC

—♦—

Food Trucks

—♦—

Live Music

—♦—

Beer Garden

—♦—

Highland Dancing

Highland dance or Highland dancing (Scottish Gaelic: dannsa Gàidhealach) is a style of competitive solo dancing developed in the Scottish Highlands in the 19th and 20th centuries in the context of competitions at public events such as the Highland games. It was ‘created from the Gaelic folk dance repertoire, but formalized with the conventions of ballet’, and has been subject to influences from outside the Highlands. Highland dancing is often performed to the accompaniment of Highland bagpipe music and dancers wear specialised shoes called ghillies. It is now seen at nearly every modern-day Highland games event.

Highland dance should not be confused with Scottish country dance, Irish dance, cèilidh dancing, step dance, or clog dance, although they may be demonstrated at presentations and present at social events.

—♦—

Pipe Bands

Pipe bands are a long-standing tradition in other areas with Celtic roots, such as the regions of Galicia, Asturias and Cantabria in Northern Spain and Brittany in Western France, as well as other regions with Celtic influence in other parts of Europe. The tradition is also long-standing in the British Commonwealth of Nations countries and former British colonies such as the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Brunei, Sri Lanka and Pakistan. Pipe bands have also been established in countries with few Scottish or Celtic connections such as Thailand, Colombia, Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina.

—♦—

Caber Toss

The caber toss is a traditional Scottish athletic event in which competitors toss a large tapered pole called a “caber”. It is normally practised at the Scottish Highland Games. In Scotland the caber is usually made from a Larch tree and is typically 19 feet 6 inches (5.94 m) tall and weighs 175 pounds (79 kg). The term “caber” derives from the Gaelic word cabar, which refers to a wooden beam. The person tossing the caber is called a “tosser” or a “thrower”. It is said to have developed from the need to toss logs across narrow chasms (in order to cross them), lumberjacks needing to transport logs by throwing them in streams, or by lumberjacks challenging each other to a small contest. The record for most caber tosses in 3 minutes is currently held by Danny Frame (Canadian). He managed to perform 16 successful caber tosses on 20 July 2018 at the Heart of the Valley Festival in Middleton, Nova Scotia, Canada.

—♦—

Hammer Throw

The hammer throw is one of the four throwing events in regular track and field competitions, along with the discus throw, shot put and javelin. The “hammer” used in this sport is not like any of the tools also called by that name. It consists of a metal ball attached by a steel wire to a grip. The size of the ball varies between men’s and women’s competitions. The hammer evolved from its early informal origins to become part of the Scottish Highland games in the late 18th century, where the original version of the event is still contested today.

—♦—

Scotch Pies

A Scotch pie or mutton pie is a small, double-crust meat pie filled with minced mutton or other meat. It may also be known as a shell pie or mince pie (although the latter term is ambiguous) to differentiate it from other varieties of savoury pie, such as the steak pie, steak and kidney pie, steak-and-tattie (potato) pie, and so forth. The Scotch pie is believed to originate in Scotland, but can be found in other parts of the United Kingdom, and is widely sold all over Canada. They are often sold alongside other types of hot food in football grounds, traditionally accompanied by a drink of Bovril, resulting in the occasional reference to football pies.

—♦—

Kids Play Zone

—♦—

Whisky Tasting

And so much more, come along and see for yourself.